Shreya Ghosal has teamed up with Deepak Pandit to give us a ghazal album Humnasheen.

The album starts with Ye Aasman. With rich music arrangement (that remains so throughout the album), this ghazal is treated like a typical ghazal and that’s a relief. The ghazal has just the right amount of ‘thehraav’ that you come to associate with ghazals, real ghazals. The use of violin in between reminds us of those Jagjit Singh Ghazals during the golden period of ghazal gayaki. Shreya is predictably at ease in higher or lower notes and her neat singing takes the ghazal higher. The use of Mohan veena is exemplary as well.

Naam likh kar has a soothing start thanks to a delicate tête-à-tête between Sitar and Guitar. The tête-à-tête continues well throughout the ghazal. The ghazal is slow and treads well. With good amount of pauses, this ghazal is reserved for those long evenings when you have memories as your companion.

Ye dil jo has a flute beginning. It’s refreshing to hear a ghazal composed like this in 2014 because such efforts are on their way southwards. The use of tabla and the overall feel of the song (and tarana in between) will enthrall you if you are one of those who like ghazal and not a techno fest with ‘slow’ singing.

Raaton ko The ghazal starts with Shreya’s tarana. This is a pure romantic ghazal and the able use of Sitar and Tabla among other things paints a perfect picture of the same. I somehow didn’t like the use of violin in this ghazal though.

Maahi rok na has a delightful beginning, almost thumri like. It’s a delight to hear Shreya reciting those lines in old fashion gayaki. Sarangi finally makes an entry in this geet. Keeping the overall pace of the album, this one falls flat to my ears. (The sarangi riff in between does remind you of ‘maine to tere tere ve chareya doriyan’ part of Patakha guddi!). The digital claps in the background worsen the effect. Passable track.

Meri Talaash starts like one those old songs which were sung by talented singers in big halls. Even though the irritating claps do make a continuous appearance in this song as well, the classy singing by Shreya along with a splendid Sarangi saves this ghazal.

Shamma jalti rahi starts with Shreya again melodiously reciting lines in good old style of gayaki. The treatment of this ghazal appeared a tad filmi to me but there is decent amount of stillness (mainly due to the structure of the tune) to make up for that. Will I listen to this again? No. Is it good? Yes.

Kuch rishtey will hold your attention due to it’s lyrics and sitar. The flute and singing of Shreya Ghosal is, as expected brilliant.

After the 2011 released Irshaad, I couldn’t find a single ghazal album that I would be happy to put my money on. Finally, Humnasheen breaks that jinx and everyone associated with the album should be proud of this effort which sticks to the brief (of ghazals) more often than not and doesn’t miss a note.

Highly recommended for ghazal lovers and lovers of ‘slow’ songs yo bro! :)

Lyrics credit

Ye aasmaan – Manoj Muntashir

Naam likh kar – Vaibhav modi

Ye jo dil pyar ka – Manoj Muntashir

Raaton ko – Ahmed Anees

Maahi rokna aaj (geet) – Manoj Muntashir

Teri Talash – Manoj Muntashir

Shamma jalti rahi – Manoj Muntashir

Kuch rishtey – Ajay jhingran

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